web analytics

How to Ship a Shot Glass

Ship a shot glassShot glasses are some of the most sought-after collectibles. Almost every souvenir shop in museums, zoos, theme parks and other tourist attractions in every part of the world has a shot glass to offer.  They can be cheap numbers emblazoned with printed designs or rare ones made from crystal. Vintage shot glasses are also high valued like those from manufacturers who have already ceased production or those released to commemorate important events from way back.

Because of their popularity, shot glasses are easily sold in online auction sites or traded among collectors. While they are small and can be conveniently boxed for shipping, shot glasses are fragile and must be packaged properly for transport to ensure that it reaches its destination in good shape.  Here are some tips on how to properly pack and ship a shot glass to prevent any breakage, scratches, chipping and other forms of damage.

Wrap the shot glass in tissue paper to protect it from dust or other materials that could scratch its surface. Then, wrap it in several layers of bubble wrap, paying extra attention to the rim which is prone to damage. This step is particularly important if packing together several glasses in one box. The bubble wrap will provide padding and cushion that will prevent damage to the glasses in case they collide inside the box or from any external impact during transit. Make sure to secure the wrap in place with tape.

Next, find a box that is about 2-inches larger on all sides, top and bottom than the wrapped shot glass. Fill its bottom with a layer of packing peanuts then lay the wrapped shot glass on top-center. Then fill all sides and top with more packing peanuts until there are no void spaces inside the box. The idea is to keep the glass immobile in the center, away from the sides, top and bottom of the box.

When shipping several shot glasses in one package, arrange the wrapped glasses in the center of a large box with a layer of packing materials in the bottom. Fill spaces between the glasses, sides and top of the box with packing materials until there is no movement.

Close the box and seal with heavy duty packaging tape. Make sure to reinforce all openings and seams with tape, including the ones in the bottom of the box. For extremely fragile shot glasses, consider double boxing to ensure optimum protection from the rough shipping environment.

You might also like:

Leave a reply